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CPU – The CPU engine is used. This engine does not require a graphics card and supports many of the regular V-Ray renderer features, including procedural textures and complex materials.
OpenCL
– A GPU engine based on OpenCL is used. This engine uses graphics cards that support OpenCL and can be very fast depending on the hardware, but has somewhat limited abilities with regards to shaders. The OpenCL and CUDA engines have the same set of capabiltities, but for nVidia for NVIDIA GPUs it is recommended to use the CUDA engine.
CUDA
– A GPU engine based on the nVidia the NVIDIA CUDA platform. This engine uses nVidia uses NVIDIA graphics cards that support CUDA and is the recommended engine for nVidia for NVIDIA GPUs. Like the OpenCL engine, it can be very fast depending on hardware, but has limited abilities with regards to shaders. The OpenCL and CUDA engines have the same set of capabilities. The recommended choice for nVidia for NVIDIA GPUs.

Trace depth – Represents the maximum number of bounces that will be computed for reflections and refractions. The individual material reflection/refraction depth settings are still considered, so long as they don't exceed the value specified here.

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In-process RT engine – When enabled, the actual rendering of the image happens inside the 3ds Max process. This speeds up the initial scene translation phase and improves the interactivity of ActiveShade rendering. When disabled, a separate V-Ray standalone render server is launched in DR mode to perform the actual rendering. This option might need to be disabled if V-Ray RT cannot find suitable GPUs for rendering with the CUDA or OpenCL engines. An example is when there are an AMD and an nVidia an NVIDIA GPU installed in the machine, and the AMD GPU is used for handling the user interface and 3ds Max viewports whereas the nVidia the NVIDIA GPU is only used for rendering.

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