Main Modules



This first lesson will guide us through the process of setting up a simple scene. It provides a base understanding of the V-Ray Interface and where to find the most commonly used parameters.

You can download the lesson guide here.

Lesson 1 has three main parts: UI OverviewRendering Modes and VFB (V-Ray Frame Buffer) which are annotated in the video. You can find scene files with the same names in the Lesson 1 folder. These were made so that you can start at any one of these stages and follow the steps in the video to the end.

 

 

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UI Overview:


The first part of the tutorial covers the V-Ray interface in SketchUp. The main options can be found in the V-Ray Asset Editor - in here you can adjust the render settings, control the lights in the scene, create and adjust materials and work with V-Ray specific geometries.

In this example, we are going to use a simple Plane Light to illuminate our scene. We will only adjust the Intensity of the light here - all the lights are examined in more detail in the Extra videosof this lesson

We will also learn how to use the materials found in the V-Ray Material Library and how to properly set their scale/tiling

Rendering Modes


In the second part, we discuss the different ways V-Ray can render:

           

VFB - V-Ray Frame Buffer


This module covers the basic settings of the V-Ray Frame Buffer.

 

Extra Modules 



This lesson comes with 8 Extra modules. For each module there is a video, and a scene file with the same name in the Lesson 1 folder

You can download the lesson guide   here.

1. Lights Plane


 

 

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This extra module covers the Plane Light in more detail. The Plane Light is a physically accurate light source that has a physical measurable area which emits the light and the light decays (loses intensity) accurately as it travels through space. The shape and size of the light affect the softness/sharpness of the shadows cast by it.

Main settings - these settings are the same for all V-Ray lights:

Plane light specific options

2. Light Sphere



 

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This extra module uses the Sphere Light to discuss the Units parameter and demonstrate how it relates to the light intensity and size. The Sphere Light is a physically accurate light source that has the shape of a sphere. It emits light in all directions equally and the light decays (loses intensity) accurately as it travels through space.

3. Spot Light



 

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This extra module discusses the Spot Light - a light source that can create the effect of a flash light or spot light which focus the light in one area. This source emits the light from an infinitely small point in space so it cannot be seen by the camera or in clear reflections.  The settings we discuss in the video are:

4. Light IES



 

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This extra module discusses the IES Light - A light source that allows us to introduce real world lights into the scene. Lighting manufacturers sometimes provide .ies files which hold photometric data for the lights they manufacture. You can use a V-Ray IES Light to load those files and have the physically accurate illumination in SketchUp.

5. Light Omni



 

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This extra module uses the Point Light to examine some of the extra parameters of lights. A Point Light is an infinitely small point (like the Spot Light) that emits light in all directions equally. This light cannot be seen by the camera or in clear reflections. It creates sharp shadows by default. The Shadow radius parameter allows us to specify a radius of the shape of the light that is used only when calculating shadows. Larger numbers make the shadows softer.

6. Animation


This module covers the workflow for rendering an animation with V-Ray.

 

 

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7. Batch Rendering


This module covers the workflow for rendering multiple views of a scene using the Batch Render functionality of V-Ray.

 

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8. Advanced VFB



 

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This extra module goes deeper into some of the settings of the V-Ray Frame Buffer including: